in-the-thick-of-sequester-debates-the-comment-is-often-heard-that-we-should-cut-with-a-scalpel-instead-of-hacking-with-an-ax

Scalpel

Daniela A. Robles Uncategorized

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In the thick of the sequester debate, the comment is often heard that we should cut with a scalpel instead of hacking with an ax. The problem with the scalpel scenario is that if you cut over and over, the instrument becomes less significant, the problem lies in the fact that you are cutting.

Remember when each school had a Registered Nurse?

Remember when each school had a librarian?

Remember when each school had summer school?

Remember when each school had a school resource officer?

Remember when each school had an assistant prinipal?

Remember when each school had a counselor?

Many of us experience this trip down memory lane with hesitation. Perhaps, the structures and human capital of long ago were extravagant. When a student is sick, or suffers a head injury, it really isn’t necessary to have a person with medical training care for that child. A substitute in lieu of a regular classroom teacher becomes a luxury considering we can split a class among various grade levels for a day or two. Counselors? The tragedy at Sandy Hook reminded us that the issue is gun control, not mental health care, correct? We can rest assured that students who are exhibiting “signs” of trouble can seek counseling outside of school.

Year after year, our use of a scalpel has proven that we can slice our way through budget shortfalls. Do more with less is the mode of operation. Surely, we aren’t creating any circumstances that we can’t reverse. We know that we never have unintended consequences result from cutting too much or too deep. We know that with each cut, we don’t just concern ourselves with the numbers, but we consider that we are serving Arizona’s greatest resource-the future.

 

Daniela A. Robles

Phoenix, Arizona

I am a teacher and beginning my fourteenth year of teaching in Arizona’s public schools. The greatest lessons I learned were from teaching first grade for ten years. My inspirations stem from these past few years where my classroom has ranged from the Intervention Room to the Coaches’ Room.

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