melting money and ice

A Choice and a Voice

Donnie Dicus Uncategorized

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People do not care about public education! That was the message that many Arizonan educators received back in November as a wave of school overrides failed at the ballot. Shortly after, the budget for public education was drastically cut which further drilled that message into teachers. I wanted to believe that the voters and elected leaders had our best interest in place, but it was a hard pill for me to swallow. These circumstances caused a huge setback for teachers in Arizona and I am still not entirely sure how these measures are going to impact my profession or students in the coming years.

However, due to recent events, I have learned that the message that I was holding onto through out winter and spring was wrong. I was wrong. People do care about public education. They just wanted to have a voice in the decisions being made so they used the ballot box to be heard.

School districts have huge budgets. I was astounded when I learned that my district runs on a 100 million dollar a year budget. Even though that is not nearly enough, that is an astronomical amount of money on paper that many of us cannot fathom how to manage. I can totally understand a voter’s perspective. “That school already has millions of dollars flowing in! Why do they need another hundred thousand!?” Put in that frame, it makes perfect sense that voters said no back in November.

I wonder if voters truly understood why the money was needed, would the outcome have been different. I know money leaves a trail but it gets very hard to follow as it moves from the government into the hands of district administrators. Add on all of the red tape for specific requirements for certain amounts of money, (i.e. money that may only be used for special education services or extracurricular activities) and it is near impossible to understand where the money is going. When people do not understand where the money is going or how it is being used, then of course they are not going to funnel more money into the system.

I recently completed a fundraiser on www.gofundme.com. I asked friends and family to donate money that I could use to buy iPads for my classroom. I was quite clear in my goal and explained my rationale. Within three weeks, I had raised nearly $2500. In South Carolina last week, comedian Stephen Colbert recently funded every existing project for teachers on www.donorschoose.org. He paid out almost $800,000 which allowed teachers to fund their projects.

I began to compare these two situations to what happened in Arizona. One major thing stuck out to me. The donors who gave money for iPads for my class selected the amount they wanted to give knowing full well where the funds would go. Colbert got to decide that he wanted to fund the teachers in South Carolina. My donors and Colbert both had a choice and a voice in how the funds would be used so they were willing to give money. My project and the projects on donorschoose.org are well-explained so it is quite clear how the funds are to be used.

What if school budgets were more transparent? What if voters better understood where the money was going? What if voters had more of a choice in how the money was allocated? What if voters could refuse paying there taxes until the legislature created a budget for education that satisfied them? I do not have the answers to these questions but both of the examples given prove my first message wrong. People do care about public education. They just want a choice and a voice in the process. I can’t argue with that because, as a teacher, I want the same thing.

 

Donnie Dicus

Tucson, Arizona

My name is Donnie Dicus and I have been teaching in Arizona for 12 years. I came to Arizona from Southern Illinois to attend the University of Arizona in Tucson. I graduated in 2003 and began teaching second grade. I taught second grade in Tucson for 8 years before moving to Phoenix. I now teach third grade. I achieved National Board Certification in 2012 and I received my Master's Degree from Grand Canyon University in 2015. I achieved a National Board Certificate in Middle Childhood Generalist in 2012. I’ve been teaching mainstream and SEI 3rd grade classrooms in the Cartwright School District in Phoenix since 2013. I taught 2nd grade and was a math interventionist in Tucson in the Amphitheater School District. I’ve been a technology coach and have helped teachers apply technology to improve instruction. I facilitate coaching cohorts for teachers going through the National Board process and organize peer groups at my site to pair new teachers with experienced teachers. In 2010 I was nominated as a Rodel Semi-Finalist for Exemplary teaching in 2010 and featured as a Teacher Leader in February 2016 by the Arizona K12 Center. I have class pictures of every single student I have taught behind my desk on my wall. After 12 years, that is approximately 350 students. My students know that this is my Wall of Accomplishments. I am so proud of the difference I made in their lives. I became a teacher to make a difference and I strive to do so every day.

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  • Sandy Merz

    There’s a chance my school will pay for a math and language arts program for my school. Two teachers, myself and another, found the program independently, used the month long free trial and asked our principal if we could get it. He was impressed about this coincidence and is moving on getting a site license. But if that doesn’t happen, it’s over to Donorschoose for my math class. I mentioned that to one friend who said to let her know so that she could donate. It’s a $250 program for one class and I have zero doubt that it will get funded. When something is transparent and one can see dollar for dollar where a program is going, people support education in a heartbeat.

  • Misha Freeman

    Understanding is a great start. The more transparent school
    are with all that we do, the more parental involvement we can get. We need to
    spend our time not worrying about parents that do not show up or support and
    spend out time and effort looking for ways to get information to our parents.

  • http://www.leadfromINtheclassroom.com/ Jess Ledbetter

    Interesting post! My classroom has been so generously supported by donors through Donors Choose! Over the past three years, I’ve funded almost $4000 in projects. When donors support the project, I love the messages of support for my students and the work we are doing in my classroom. It’s really uplifting. I agree that many voters care about education–just like donors on GoFundMe and Donors Choose clearly support teachers. Unfortunately, it seems that our elections are corrupted by political interest groups, attack ads, and the views of small groups of people–that are spread to the masses (who honestly don’t always have the time to find out truth). Keeping the dialogue going in the community is one important step–and teachers should use their voices (as you do Donnie!) to connect with the voters who do care about education. Together, we move forward!

  • Amethyst Hinton Sainz

    I hadn’t thought of the connection between crowd funding an budget transparency. Good thought! I suppose the difficult thing is that what would budget transparency look like? How many voters would take the time to understand all of the “red tape” regarding how money must be used and distributed in districts? Still, you make a valid point that just as we have an obligation to provide each child with a quality education, we have an obligation to show voters where their money goes.

    I wonder how transparency would work for corporate tax loopholes, privatized prison systems and profitable charter schools as well?